Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Being from the Northeast, I don’t find Cincinnati’s fall foliage all that impressive. Nonetheless, I’m here now, so I’ve spent the last couple of weeks documenting the best examples of fall color I could find. Over-the-Rhine’s distinguished architecture is, of course, a photogenic backdrop. I’m pretty happy with the results.

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

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7 thoughts on “Autumn in Over-the-Rhine

  1. Lovely! It looks like you’re surrounded by some amazing architecture where you live. It must be inspiring!

  2. Arianna, our neighborhood absolutely serves as a muse. You can read about its history and architecture here, and I occasionally post photos from my neighborhood walks as well, like the ones above.

  3. Cincinnati doesn’t get that hard freeze early enough to spike the colors in the leaves, my wife and I were just talking this the other day how the colors just don’t get as vibrant down here.
    We’re probably not going to make it up north soon enough to see any in person this year.
    You still managed to capture some nice scenes and pictures.

  4. Thanks, Schwartz. It’s been a fun challenge to try to capture whatever glorious fall foliage I could, even though there’s not much of it here. When I lived in California, the lack of discernible fall really made me homesick, but there was a maple tree in front of my house — the only bit of fall color I ever saw out there. It put a smile on my face. Same here.

  5. There are several tree species that turn orange or red during autumn in North America, but there are almost no species like that native to Europe. When chlorophyll breaks down in fall, some trees produce anthrocyanin as a side effect. Anthrocyanin makes the leaves red. There’s still debate about why this is.

    You wonder whether all the European settlers, the Germans, the Irish, and others who arrived later, planted what they were accustomed to, rather than what was available. Hence, lots of yellow, not much red. African Americans arriving on the Underground Railroad were used to southern autumns, which also tend to be more yellow, and more brief.

    Check out: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090813142150.htm

  6. Pingback: Sunset in Over-the-Rhine « Visualingual

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