The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

Located on the corner of Lexington Ave. and 42nd St. in the Midtown East area of Manhattan, the Art Deco Chanin Building was designed for Irwin S. Chanin by Sloan & Robertson and completed in 1928.

Chanin, who had trained as an architect at Cooper Union, worked with Sloan & Robertson on the design, which was inspired by Eliel Saarinen’s unbuilt plan for the Chicago Tribune Building. As one of the tallest structures of its time, the building originally had an open-air observatory on the 54th floor.

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The 56-floor tower is set back from the street in a mix of buff brick, limestone, and terra cotta with decorative bronze elements. A stylized terra cotta band features curving and angular leaf-like forms:

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

Inside, bronze relief panels designed by Rene Paul Chambellan perch above ornate radiator grilles.

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

Chambellan and Jacques Delamarre further carried the geometric decorative motifs into the design of the two lobbies.

The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

Sadly, this is where my documentation ends. As soon as I entered the lobby, I got yelled at by two guards simultaneously for taking the above photo. Apparently, the Art Deco light fixtures contain state secrets that cannot be shared online, but you can see more of the interior here and here, plus more exterior photos here.

One thought on “The Chanin Building by Sloan & Robertson

  1. Pingback: Rockefeller Center in NYC | Visualingual

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